Author Archives: ytadmin

Jack Lapp Jersey Outlet

OAKLAND — Sean Murphy sat around patiently for three days as he waited to get his first taste of big league action after joining the A’s on Sunday as a September callup. That chance finally came Wednesday, and he wasted no time making an impact.

Murphy provided a glimpse into what the A’s believe is a bright future behind the dish for the 24-year-old catcher, showing off his power in his Major League debut with a solo blast as his first career hit in a 4-0 victory over the Angels. The win keeps Oakland percentage points ahead of Cleveland for the second American League Wild Card.

The home run came in the fifth inning off Angels reliever Jake Jewell on a 0-1 pitch to put the A’s ahead by two. Murphy belted the fastball left over the heart of the plate at 105.8 mph off the bat, the second-hardest hit ball of the night by either club, and drove it over the Coliseum’s high wall in right-center for a projected 409 feet, according to Statcast.

“I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t nervous,” Murphy said. “But once we settled into the game, and of course a home run helps, I felt much better out there. It’s the same game I’ve been playing, so nothing new.”

• Box score

While his group of supporters, which included parents Mike and Marge, his girlfriend and brother-in-law all losing their minds in excitement from their seats behind the A’s dugout, Murphy was even-keeled. He calmly chewed his piece of bubble gum with a straight face as he rounded the bases.

Oakland A’s

@Athletics
Sean’s comments on having his parents in the stands for his first game and home run has us crying in the club right now. #RootedInOakland

View image on Twitter
772
1:26 PM – Sep 5, 2019
Twitter Ads info and privacy
90 people are talking about this
• Murphy’s first homer an emotional scene

It was the sign of a player who knows he belongs here. Knee injuries slowed his progress this season, but A’s manager Bob Melvin knew Murphy, the A’s No. 3 prospect per MLB Pipeline, would find his way to Oakland at some point this year.

“I think he was pretty excited, he just doesn’t show it,” Melvin said. “He’s calm in his demeanor and stoic. He wants to be that captain. But I think he was going crazy inside.”

It should come as no surprise that Murphy’s first hit left the yard. This just continues a trend he began this year at Triple-A Las Vegas, where he bashed 10 home runs in just 120 at-bats, putting together a whopping home-run-per-fly-ball rate of 31.3 percent.

“That’s not the last time you’ll see him hit a home run to [the opposite field] like that,” Melvin said. “He’s got power all the way around the field. In the last couple of years, he really developed the power. He’s a big kid with great leverage. You look at his exit velos and they’re off the charts. I’m glad he got off to a good start.”

Melvin on Murpy’s MLB debut
Sep 5th, 2019 · 4:26
Melvin on Murpy’s MLB debut
For as good as Murphy’s bat is expected to be, it was mostly his defense that led to his third-round selection by the A’s in 2016, and he appeared to settle in quickly behind the plate by catching a shutout in his first Major League start. He displayed a good rapport with Tanner Roark, who went 6 2/3 scoreless innings to pick up his ninth win of the season.

Roark and Murphy sat in the A’s clubhouse prior to the previous night’s game to break down what type of pitches to expect and to go over signs. Though Murphy encountered some rough waters in the early going, including a situation in the third where he was crossed up and charged with catcher interference on a would-be strike three to Shohei Ohtani, the battery soon got on the same page.

“The further I went in the game, the more he was quick to say yes to everything, which is what you want to keep that rhythm going,” Roark said. “It’s tough to be working with a pitcher for the first time in the big leagues. As we progressed, he was more aware of what I wanted to throw and had a better feel. Those last three innings, we started rolling with quick outs.”

Roark K’s 6 over 6 2/3 innings
Sep 5th, 2019 · 0:46
Roark K’s 6 over 6 2/3 innings
Murphy leaned on Roark’s seven years of Major League experience as guidance through what he admitted was a nervous feeling as he took the field in the first inning.

“Tanner was great,” Murphy said. “He’s a vet with a guy making his first start back there, and he worked with me every step of the way. He let me know what I was doing and what I needed to do. I’m glad he was there.”

In catching the full shutout, Murphy became the first A’s catcher to do so in his Major League debut since Jack Lapp on Sept. 11, 1908.

“Hit a homer and catch a shutout. Not a bad start,” Melvin said. “I think he’ll probably tell you he’s just as proud of the shutout as he is the homer.”

Jack Aragon Jersey Outlet

The New Yorker magazine’s nightlife listings begin with this suggestion: “Musicians and night-club proprietors lead complicated lives; It’s advisable to check in advance to confirm engagements.” That could very well apply to the Marin live music scene as well. It’s a fluid, ever-changing, some would say even crazy, business. And that’s what makes drummer Michael Aragon’s 36-year run at the No Name Bar in Sausalito such an incredible milestone.

RELATED ARTICLES
The life and death of Lisa Kindred, a Marin blues singer with a big voice and a big heart
New Janis Joplin bio captures singer’s tragic life, happiness she found in Marin
“Undoubtedly, it’s the longest continuous jazz gig in the Bay Area,” says the 75-year-old musician before playing his regular weekly show last Friday night. “Not one band has played at one spot for 36 years.”

After all that time, Aragon’s tenure at the colorful downtown watering hole finally comes to an end this month. The Michael Aragon Quartet plays on the bar’s cramped little stage the next two Friday nights, and that’s it. For the many friends and fans the charismatic drummer has made over nearly four decades, these final shows have been bittersweet.

“We will miss him so much, because it will never be the same,” says artist Carolyn Meyer, who has been coming to see Aragon and his quartet most Friday nights since moving to Sausalito 15 years ago. “It’s an era that’s ending. We’ve seen Sausalito go through some changes, and this is another one. It’s absolutely sad.”

That sadness isn’t just about Aragon’s retirement from No Name. It goes deeper than that. Three years ago, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer that has metastasized into his bones. He doesn’t know how many years he has left, and he wants the freedom to spend more time with his wife, Amanda, and do some traveling while he still can.

Staying mindful

“Life is a very interesting thing,” he says as we walk along a darkened Bridgeway before the gig. “If you stay mindful and you look around, you can have a lot of fun, especially if you think there’s no more left.”

I’ve known Aragon since the early 1970s. He was one of the first musicians I met when I first moved to Marin. We jammed in a big house in San Anselmo where he was living at the time. There was something special about that day, and I’ve never forgotten it.

As we walk along, catching up on our lives since then, he offers to show me the house where he was born. We come to it on the south end of Bridgeway. Jack London is believed to have written “The She-Wolf” there. A stately old place with a turret, it looks like a castle overlooking the bay and San Francisco’s skyline.

“I was born right up there,” he says, pointing to an upstairs room, as little waves sigh on a small beach where he used to play as a child. He explains that he comes from a line of Portuguese landowners and business people that go way back in the history of Sausalito. He credits his mother, a powerful, religious woman, with instilling in him his love of music.

“She would push me down this sidewalk in a stroller and sing to me,” he says. “When I got my first jazz gig, the guy who hired me asked who taught me all the lyrics to the songs? I said, ‘My mom.’ She turned me on to music.”

Numerous tragedies

In his adult life, Aragon has suffered through unthinkable tragedies, more than any one person should have to bear. His son, Franklin, was 31 when he died of cancer. His 23-year-old daughter, Sheila, was killed by a hit-and-run driver. His late wife, Susan, died of a brain tumor. And now, he’s dealing with his own mortality

“It’s a horrible thing, all that happened,” he says. “I thought nothing like that would ever happen to me again. Music is the thing that’s been keeping me together. If it wasn’t for that, life would be very difficult.”

The cancer keeps Aragon in a great deal of pain most of the time, but he’s resisted taking medication to ease it.

“The doctor wants to prescribe all kinds of things for me, but I refuse,” he says. “The funny thing about pain is you can make friends with it, especially if you have to choose between pain and opiates. I’m not into opiates.”

He’s found that his best medicine is to be up on stage behind his drum kit, leading his band through an evening of jazz.

“When I play, my pain level is zero,” he says. “I get in the bubble and things stop.”

Packs the bar

Back at the bar, the members of Aragon’s quartet — tenor saxophonist Rob Roth, bassist Pierre Archain and keyboardist Casey Filson — are setting up as the place begins filling with warm bodies. By the time the music starts, the narrow saloon will be standing-room-only.

Roth, the senior member of the group, figures he’s played more than a thousand Fridays since hooking up with Aragon 20 years ago.

“I haven’t gone through half of what Michael has gone through,” he says. “He really personifies what it means to persist and push through tough times in life. The time we have together playing, all that goes away. We don’t think about anything else. We’re playing with the same energy and drive we had 20 years ago. But Friday nights won’t be the same anymore.”

Fridays certainly won’t be the same for Dave Mitchell, Pulitzer Prize-winning former publisher of the Point Reyes Light, who travels every Friday with a group of friends from his home in Point Reyes Station to hear Aragon and his quartet.

“When you watch him, there’s so much emotion in his face when he’s performing,” Mitchell says. “It’s really fun to watch. I really like him and I’ve brought lots of other people along, too.”

The renowned jazz and pop drummer Harold Jones, of San Geronimo, best known for his stints with Count Basie, Frank Sinatra and Duke Ellington, stopped by to see Aragon one last time before going on the road with Tony Bennett.

“I can’t imagine what it’s gonna be like without him after all these years,” he says.

‘Music guru’

Aragon’s musical legacy goes beyond his residency at No Name. With former Sausalito Parks and Recreation director Carol Buchholz, he co-founded Jazz and Blues by the Bay, an annual summer concert series in the city’s Gabrielson Park.

“Michael was my music guru when I was in Sausalito,” says Buchholz in a phone interview. “He has contributed in so many ways to the music scene in Marin. His entire life he’s been doing this. I can only say wonderful things about the man.”

Aragon doesn’t plan to stop playing entirely, but he’ll pick and choose his gigs, rather than be pinned down to a regular schedule. For him now, it’s all about living in the moment, enjoying these last nights with his band and sharing them with the all the folks who are showing up at his final gigs to wish him well.

“Some people kid themselves, but we all know we’re going to leave here,” he says. “I stopped kidding myself years ago, probably when my son passed. There was a reality check there. So, I surround myself with positive people. You can look at it as a glass half-full kind of thing and it’s not so bad. It’s one foot in front of the other, baby, and that’s it.”

Floyd Weaver Jersey Outlet

STOCKTON — Civic leader, educator and civil rights advocate Floyd Weaver died Monday after a sudden illness at the age of 82.
Among the many highlights of his life, Weaver served eight years on the Stockton City Council, was the city’s vice mayor, honored as Stocktonian of the Year in 1992 for his contributions to the community and received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the NAACP.
Weaver died on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. He helped put the civil rights leader’s name on the park across from Stockton City Hall and the former Charter Way, and was long active in Ministers and Community United Inc., which sponsors Stockton’s annual King celebration.
For Benjamin Reddish, also a civic leader and retired Stockton educator, Weaver provided thoughtful but effective leadership.
Floyd Weaver was Stockton civic leader, educator and civil rights advocate
Previous
25/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
1/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver on June 24, 1991.
2/25HIDE CAPTION
Coach Ben Parks, left, Adrian Vera and Floyd Weaver share a laugh at the Athletic Hall of Fame 46th annual awards dinner on Nov. 17, 2010, at Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium.
3/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
4/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver and Bernice Bass with her children Khalilah, Faizah, and Elijah follow the Lincoln High color guard leading the Martin Luther King parade past City Hall on Jan. 19, 2009.
5/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that were once located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
6/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver on Feb. 6, 1978.
7/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
8/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
9/25HIDE CAPTION
Larry Stanford, left, former vice mayor Floyd Weaver, minister Walter Clay and pastor John Easter play dominoes at the Ministers and Community United, Inc. annual picnic at Kennedy Community Center Park on Aug. 20, 2011, in south Stockton.
10/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
11/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weavere gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
12/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located at the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
13/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
14/25HIDE CAPTION
Vice mayor Floyd Weaver is interviewed by Sierra Middle School student Andy Murray, 12, for his school newspaper and his 4-H club at election central at the county courthouse on Nov. 4, 1992.
15/25HIDE CAPTION
District 6 candidate Floyd Weaver, left, and district 3 candidate Ronald Coale look at election results on Nov. 8, 1988, at election central in the basement of the county courthouse on Weber Avenue.
16/25HIDE CAPTION
Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver on Feb. 9, 1989.
17/25HIDE CAPTION
Vice mayor Floyd Weaver crusied to an easy win over former city councilman Ralph Lee White on Nov. 4, 1992.
18/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
19/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
20/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
21/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
22/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
23/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
24/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Stockton Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver speaks at a march and rally honoring late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. on Jan. 19, 2004, in downtown Stockton.
25/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
1/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver on June 24, 1991.
2/25HIDE CAPTION
Coach Ben Parks, left, Adrian Vera and Floyd Weaver share a laugh at the Athletic Hall of Fame 46th annual awards dinner on Nov. 17, 2010, at Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium.
3/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
4/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver and Bernice Bass with her children Khalilah, Faizah, and Elijah follow the Lincoln High color guard leading the Martin Luther King parade past City Hall on Jan. 19, 2009.
5/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that were once located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
6/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver on Feb. 6, 1978.
7/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
8/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
9/25HIDE CAPTION
Larry Stanford, left, former vice mayor Floyd Weaver, minister Walter Clay and pastor John Easter play dominoes at the Ministers and Community United, Inc. annual picnic at Kennedy Community Center Park on Aug. 20, 2011, in south Stockton.
10/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
11/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weavere gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
12/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located at the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
13/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
14/25HIDE CAPTION
Vice mayor Floyd Weaver is interviewed by Sierra Middle School student Andy Murray, 12, for his school newspaper and his 4-H club at election central at the county courthouse on Nov. 4, 1992.
15/25HIDE CAPTION
District 6 candidate Floyd Weaver, left, and district 3 candidate Ronald Coale look at election results on Nov. 8, 1988, at election central in the basement of the county courthouse on Weber Avenue.
16/25HIDE CAPTION
Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver on Feb. 9, 1989.
17/25HIDE CAPTION
Vice mayor Floyd Weaver crusied to an easy win over former city councilman Ralph Lee White on Nov. 4, 1992.
18/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
19/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
20/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
21/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
22/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
23/25HIDE CAPTION
Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
24/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Stockton Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver speaks at a march and rally honoring late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. on Jan. 19, 2004, in downtown Stockton.
25/25HIDE CAPTION
Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
Next
“He’s been in the forefront of a lot of things in moving the Stockton community along, both as an educator and a civic leader,” Reddish said Tuesday.
“He would give the illusion of walking on water, but walking on water meant you know where the stones were in the water so you don’t sink.”
Weaver led as a consensus builder, helping bringing Stockton’s diverse community together, said Bobby Bivens, president of the NAACP Stockton branch.
“He always spoke to the fact that we have to deal with different kinds of people to make things happen,” Bivens said. “He was a person of deep thought.”
Douglass Wilhoit, chief executive officer of the Greater Stockton Chamber of Commerce and a former San Joaquin County supervisor, agreed.
“Floyd (Weaver) was a true gentleman and a true educator and a man among men,” he said. “He was what you would call a citizen politician. … He always held his head high because he always did what he had to do as a citizen politician, and that was represent the people.”
Weaver’s influence extended well beyond Stockton as well.
In 2006, Rep. Dennis Cardoza rose on the floor of the House of Representatives to call for recognition of his many contributions, noting Weaver’s then-current service on the board of the San Joaquin Regional Transit District and the California State Reclamation Board.
“He is an esteemed member of our community, a lifelong activist for all people young and old, and an outstanding human being who will leave behind a legacy to be admired for generations to come,” the legislator said.
And, despite all time he dedicated to career, civic and political interests, Weaver was also a family man, his granddaughter Elaina Weaver-Maddox said.
“He always made me feel like I was part of everything,” she said. “He was always out in the community, but he was a great father and a great grandfather.”
Floyd Weaver was born July 28, 1933, in Phoenix and moved to Stockton as a young boy, where he attended school, including Edison High School, Stockton College and University of the Pacific, where he graduated in 1957 with a bachelor’s degree in education. He later earned master’s degrees from Pacific in counseling and administration.
Before entering college, Weaver served in the U.S. Army and was a veteran of the Korean War.
He worked at the Stockton Unified School District for 37 years, as a counselor, teacher and principal of Fremont Middle School, before retiring in 1990. He was the district’s first male, African-American principal.
Weaver was appointed to a vacant City Council seat in 1988. An editorial in The Record called it a “good choice,” noting that the 53-year-old had spent about half his life in public service, including 10 years on the city Planning Commission and stints on the San Joaquin County Committee on School District Organization and the San Joaquin County Housing Authority.
He served on the City Council, where he was named vice mayor by fellow council members, until making an unsuccessful bid for the San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors in 1996.
That was despite an editorial in The Record, headlined “Weaver best choice,” that said, in part, “We sense in Weaver the combination of knowledge, political savvy, credibility and forthrightness that the other candidates lack.”
But he only somewhat slowed down, joining the RTD board in 1997, where he served until 2009, including two terms as board chairman.
Over his lifetime Weaver served as a member and leader of innumerable community, educational and civil rights groups, including the Esquire Civic Club, a men’s group dedicated to providing scholarships to young African-Americans.
While living most of his life in south Stockton, Weaver has been increasingly limited and unable to drive, Weaver-Maddox said. He and his wife lived the past five months in Somerford Place, an assisted-living facility in the Brookside neighborhood of Stockton.
He is survived by his wife, Ruth Weaver of Stockton; daughters Katrina Weaver of Stockton and Delphine Ramson of Los Angeles; brothers Clifford and Archie Weaver, both of Stockton; sister Betty Lou Ford of Stockton; and grandchildren Elaina Weaver-Maddox of Manteca and Cory Rainwater and Jessica Graham of Los Angeles.
He was preceded in death by daughter Kimberly Weaver and brother Theodore Weaver.
Arrangements are pending through Jesse E. Cooley Jr. Funeral Service in Stockton.

Jim Magnuson Jersey Outlet

SAN CARLOS — To quantify Jim Magnuson as a humble baseball aficionado seems a tad simple, yet quite fitting.

A native of San Carlos, he never strayed too far from his roots until his death last month at the age of 71.

Error 0:
John James Magnuson, most often referred to as Jim — or his nickname “Mag” — left quite an imprint on the local baseball community, beginning with the summer after his freshman year at Carlmont High.

“A lot of people associate San Carlos with Barry Bonds,” said Chris Magnuson, 33, his son. “But it was my dad, along with the other members of the ’61 Babe Ruth championship team, that put San Carlos on the map.”

A 15-year-old catcher at the time, Jim Magnuson transferred to the now-defunct San Carlos High as a sophomore.

One of his close friends, Richard Lelo, stayed at Carlmont. The rivalry that ensued came with mutual respect.

“He was a tough out,” Lelo said. “It’s not like you can throw a curveball to Magnuson and get him out, for sure. You had to mix him up and throw under his chin to get him to back up a little bit. He wouldn’t just sit on the fastball. Nothing bothered him too much and he’d hit whatever he felt like hitting. He knew how to play the game and he did it right.”

Baseball culminated each academic year in the spring for the three-sport standout at San Carlos High after football in the fall and basketball in the winter.

“He was a great tight end and he could score — shoot from outside or drive it to the basket,” Lelo said. “He was an all-around athlete.”

Reunited at CSM

After graduating from high school in 1964, the next stop wasn’t too far away as Magnuson and Lelo reunited at College of San Mateo.

Arm problems forced a shift to the outfield for Magnuson under the tutelage of John Noce, a Hall-of-Fame head coach at CSM for 31 years.

“The biggest compliment I can pay him is that he was a real Bulldog,” Noce said.

He added: “He was extremely well-liked by everybody. He had a good personality and a good sense of humor.”

As previously established, Magnuson could also hit, a trend that continued at every level.

“He had a really super unique ability to hit the ball at the very last second,” Lelo said. “Most hitters hit the ball at the front of the plate. Jim never did. Jim hit the ball after it crossed the plate and hit it out in right field, so he had what you’d call an inside-out swing. Very few people can do that. Hitting behind the runners is really valuable.”

It resulted in Magnuson routinely spraying doubles into the right-centerfield gap at CSM, which earned him special recognition.

“We ended up calling that Mag’s alley — named after him — for years,” Noce said. “He did show power on occasion, but he was a good gap hitter. He got a lot of extra-base hits.”

As a sophomore in 1966 with the Bulldogs, the baseball team entered the last day of the season on a 16-game winning streak before a showdown with City College of San Francisco.

“I think it was the longest win streak that my teams had in my 31 years at San Mateo,” Noce said. “And on the effort to get 17, that was the day we got beat by City and it was for the championship.”

Next level

Magnuson and Lelo parted ways again, this time with the former bound for UC Berkeley, while the latter had a scholarship to Cal Poly.

Neither stayed there for more than a year.

Magnuson was selected out of Cal in the 1967 MLB Draft by the Philadelphia Phillies, while Lelo signed as a free agent with the Minnesota Twins.

After three years in the minor leagues at affiliates for the Phillies and the Boston Red Sox, plus a brief stint in Quebec while once again sharing a dugout with Noce, injuries put an end to his days as a professional baseball player.

“Just gathering different notes and different things, it’s really cool to see the impact,” Chris said. “You don’t realize and it’s cliché, but I really didn’t notice until he was gone.”

“There’s some really neat stuff in his records,” added Deanna, his daughter born in 1983. “He was pretty humble about most of it.”

Return to Carlmont

Jim Magnuson returned to the Bay Area in 1969 to earn a bachelor’s degree in physical education and a minor in science from San Jose State.

In 1975, he was hired as a teacher at Carlmont, where life came full circle before he retired in 2009.

His influence was felt during back-to-back Central Coast Section baseball championships for the Scots in 1992 and 1993, the only such titles in school history.

“Do you ever remember that TV show Columbo with Peter Falk?” asked Terry Stogner, a close friend of the family and Carlmont’s athletic director until 2005. “That’s Mag. He is that kind of a character. He always presented the picture that he was kind of confused at times, that didn’t quite know what was going on, and down underneath, just like Columbo, he always solved the crime at the end.

“Mag was a lot smarter than people gave him credit for. He presented a certain picture, but underneath he was a perfect baseball man.”

Magnuson sat in the dugout for the 7-2 victory on May 29, 1992, over Santa Cruz at San Jose Municipal Stadium to clinch the CCS Division II title.

It was his last game as head coach.

“He left the program right at the middle of its height,” Stogner said. “He decided that there were other things more important in life and he needed to pay attention to his family at the time.”

The keys to the baseball program now belonged to one of his former pupils in Doug Williams.

“Mag was instrumental in helping me as a young coach,” said Williams, who graduated from Carlmont in 1983 and is currently in his 24th season as the head coach at CSM.

The Scots didn’t allow a run in the 1993 CCS playoffs, recording four straight shutouts en route to another Division II title.

It’s not about him

His daughter, who attended Notre Dame-Belmont, vaguely remembered watching some of her father’s baseball games at Carlmont.

“He was really proud of all the accomplishments of his kids, but he didn’t really take a lot of credit for it,” Deanna said. “He would talk about the specific players and their skills, less about his coaching.”

“He was leadership material,” Lelo said. “He played everything straight in his life.”

“He was not the kind of coach that told you to do it his way or you won’t play,” Stogner said. “He was always a coach that let players work it out for themselves. I think one of his favorite expressions when a kid would go out on his own and try and do something and it wouldn’t work, Mag would be, ‘Well, how is that working for you?’

“He let kids learn on their own and didn’t force the way things were going to be done. I mean, he put the players in the right position at the right time and made the right calls and that type of stuff, but the little things. ‘What do you think about this? Well, why don’t you try it and see how it works?’ ”

Not going anywhere

It’s not as if Magnuson disappeared from the baseball scene after he left the dugout.

“In talking to him the other day, I got the impression that even after he retired he spent a lot of time over there out at Burton Park in San Carlos observing the youth baseball program,” said Noce, who paid a visit to his home in San Carlos only days before Magnuson lost an abrupt battle with lung cancer on the evening of March 9.

“One of our old neighbors has a son that’s playing for San Carlos Little League right now,” Chris said. “And in recent years he would go back and try to stay involved. That was his life, it was baseball.”

He added: “What else did he talk about, right?”

Hardcore fans of the San Francisco Giants, one item off the bucket list came in 2010 with a World Series title, promptly followed by trophies in 2012 and 2014.

“I remember sitting next to dad on the couch watching those championships,” Chris said. “We didn’t know if it was going to happen in his lifetime and we got three in five years, so it was really exciting.”

“The Magnuson clan are definitely Giants fans,” said Lelo, who hoped to get his old friend, an avid fisherman, for a trip to his home just south of the Oregon border.

“I never got to take him on my drift boat down the beautiful Smith River,” he added.

Celebration of life

Diagnosed with terminal stage IV lung cancer in November, it took a while for word to get out to his friends, many who didn’t find out until after his death.

“There’s a lot of shock and disbelief because he wasn’t one to inconvenience anyone, let alone with something as minimal as his death, right?” Chris said.

“It was a disaster,” Lelo said. “His friends didn’t know until like five or six weeks before he passed. … We knew it was coming, but you just can’t be really prepared.”

In lieu of a traditional funeral service, the family opted for a celebration of life at a place near and dear to Magnuson’s heart: Harry’s Hofbrau in Redwood City.

“He loved going to Harry’s,” Deanna said. “He was a sucker for that place. He loved roast-carved turkey. It’s kind of an old-school restaurant, which he felt there aren’t that many of those around these days.”

“It’s not too formal, so that’s the way wanted it to be,” Chris said. “He didn’t really want anything at all and it’s our way to get some closure. Everybody can hang out and tell some stories about dad and have a good time.”

Related Articles
Early signing period: Bay Area’s college-bound high school athletes
Early signing period: UOP honors late Bay Area baseball star’s commitment
Family and friends will gather on Saturday from 4 to 7 p.m. at Harry’s Hofbrau, including the newest member of the family and another item off Jim Magnuson’s bucket list.

“In the last couple of years, when his daughter Deanna married Sean, they graced him as a grandpa in the last year of his life with little Ethan,” Lelo said. “And that’s what really made him proud. He was quite happy with little baby Ethan. And Chris is like a 6-foot-5 or 6-foot-6 tall spring bean, a promising young kid. They all have a bright life looking forward.”

Jim Magnuson is survived by his sister, Karen Magnuson of Clearlake, son-in-law and daughter, Sean and Deanna Magnuson Griffin, and grandson, Ethan Griffin of Redwood City, son, Chris Magnuson of San Carlos and ex-wife, Nanci Glass Magnuson, of Belmont.

Bob Johnson Jersey Outlet

Apparently, Trump is on his way to another presidential election victory according to BET founder Robert Johnson, reports Deadline.

“If you take a snapshot today, I don’t think that group is capable of beating Trump despite what the polls say,” Johnson, 73, told CNBC. “I think the president has always been in a position where it’s his to lose based on his bringing a sort of disruptive force into what would be called political norms.”

The country’s first black billionaire stated in July that the Democrats running for the presidency have become too liberal and he has no plans on supporting a particular 2020 candidate nor does he have any intention in supporting Donald Trump, as of now.

“I think the economy is doing great, and it’s particularly reaching populations that heretofore had very bad problems in terms of jobs and employment and the opportunities that come with employment,” Johnson said at the time. “African American unemployment is at its lowest level… I give the president a lot of credit for moving the economy in a positive direction that’s benefiting a large amount of Americans.”

Johnson also feels the president’s unorthodox style has an advantage, especially among his core base. “I think the president has always been in a position where it’s his to lose based on his bringing a sort of disruptive force into what would be called political norms,” Johnson, who founded Black Entertainment Television (BET) and RLJ Companies business network, told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble.

He also explained that Trump “brings his style” to the way he handles such issues as foreign policy or immigration. That’s something that the president’s supporters like and the reason why they voted for him and will do so again next year added Johnson.

Johnson is the founder and chairman of The RLJ Companies, a portfolio of companies with holdings in several industries, including the RLJ McLarty Landers Holdings L.L.C., the highest-earning black-owned auto company with revenues of $1.8 billion and ranked No.1 on the 2019 BE Auto 40 list of the nation’s largest black-owned businesses, Black Enterprise‘s annual “BE100s” list.

Ferris Fain Jersey Outlet

OAKLAND, CA – AUGUST 2: Baseball hall of famer Reggie Jackson of the 1973 World Champion Oakland Athletics waves to the crowd during a ceremony before the game against the New York Yankees at the Network Associates Coliseum on August 2, 2003 in Oakland, California. The Yankees defeated the Athletics 10-7. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
“Reggie Jackson doesn’t belong in the Hall of Fame any more than my grandmother does,” Ferris Fain said in 1995. “How many runners did he keep from advancing with all those strikeouts?”

Fain had a point about strikeouts.

In the seventh game of the 1962 World Series, the New York Yankees had the bases loaded with no outs in the top of the fifth inning at Candlestick Park. Tony Kubek hit into a double play, scoring Bill Skowron from third base with the game’s only run.

Sometimes, even a double play beats a strikeout.

Ferris Fain rarely struck out. He was drafted from the San Francisco Seals by the Philadelphia Athletics on Nov. 1, 1946 and was a mainstay at first base for Philadelphia from 1947-52.

Fain led the American League in batting in 1951 with a .344 average and again in 1952 when he hit .327. In 1952, he struck out 20 times and walked 80 times. The following season, he struck out 26 times with 105 walks.

In his six seasons in Philadelphia, Fain batted .297/.426/.408. In those days, he was appreciated for his ability to draw walks and not strike out. There was no statistic called “on-base percentage” until the early 1950s. Fain had a higher lifetime on-base percentage than even Mickey Mantle (.424 to .421).

After he won the 1952 batting title, Fain was traded to the Chicago White Sox, basically for slugging first baseman Eddie Robinson because Philadelphia wanted more power at first base.

A factor that contributed to the trade was that Fain had a terrible temper that sometimes got the best of him. He was often involved in fisticuffs, which didn’t please Athletics management. He liked alcohol and was a heavy drinker.

Teammate Eddie Joost, who drew more than 100 walks for six consecutive seasons with the Athletics, spoke about Fain. “He had a lifestyle of his own and would do exactly what he wanted to do. There were many things the players didn’t like about him.”

On the way to winning the 1951 batting title, Fain broke a bone in his foot when he kicked the bag because he was frustrated that he had made an out.

In 1952, it was worse. Fain was involved in a fight in a bar when some patrons started heckling him. He missed many games, but returned in time to qualify for the batting title.

Philadelphia set a record for the most double plays in a season with 217 in 1949. Fain was involved in 194 of them, which is still a record.

No first baseman was more aggressive than Fain. I remember watching a New York Yankees game with Phil Rizzuto on first and Joe Collins batting. Casey Stengel gave Collins, who was a left-handed hitter with good power, the bunt sign.

Fain, as he usually did, came charging toward the plate, daring Collins to swing away to try to hit the ball past him. Mel Allen always referred to him as “Fearless Ferris Fain.”

After a relatively short career that ended at the age of 34, Fain moved back to California, where he spent the rest of his life. It’s too bad so few individuals have heard about Ferris Fain.

Lance Rautzhan Jersey Outlet

It is an annual tradition here at Brew Crew Ball to take a moment before turning the calendar to a new year to look back and remember the members of the Brewers and Wisconsin’s baseball history that we’ve lost over the last 12 months. This year our list includes five former Brewers and one Milwaukee Brave. As is invariably the case, I likely missed someone somewhere along the line: If you could please add them in the comments, it would be appreciated.

Thanks to the B-Ref Play Index for their help compiling this list.

Lance Rautzhan, age 63, passed away on January 9

A third-round pick in the 1970 draft, Rautzhan’s big league tenure was brief but he made the most of his time, pitching in the World Series for the Dodgers in both his MLB-debut 1977 season and again in 1978. He was the winning pitcher in Game 3 of the 1977 NLCS despite facing just one batter in the game, his postseason debut.

The Brewers purchased Rautzhan from the Dodgers in May of 1979 and he made just three appearances for Milwaukee. He had lost command of the strike zone at that point and walked 21 batters in 12 2/3 innings in his final MLB season, including ten in three innings as a Brewer. He spent his final professional season in 1980 pitching for the Brewers’ AAA affiliate in Vancouver.

Virgil Jester, age 88, passed away on February 15

Jester made his MLB debut as a member of the 1952 Boston Braves and followed the team to Milwaukee, where he posted a pair of rough outings on the road in 1953 before returning to the minors. He never appeared in a game at Milwaukee County Stadium.

Jester’s passing leaves just four surviving members of the 1953 Braves:

Catcher Del Crandall, age 86
Pitcher Johnny Antonelli, age 86
Second baseman Mel Roach, age 83
Pitcher Joey Jay, age 81

Ron Theobald, age 72, passed away on April 15

Originally signed by the Cubs as an amateur free agent in 1964, Theobald spent time in the minors with four organizations before the Washington Senators traded him to the Brewers in 1970. He made his MLB debut with the Brewers on April 12, 1971. On June 8, 1971, he became the third player in franchise history to lead off a game with a home run.

Theobald was the Brewers’ regular second baseman for two seasons, appearing in 251 games between 1971 and 1972. His 107 hits in 1971 were the third-most on the team, and his .342 on-base percentage was the third-best among players who made at least 324 plate appearances.

Ruben Quevedo, age 37, passed away on June 7

Born in Venezuela, Quevedo was signed by the Braves as an amateur free agent in 1995 and sent to the Cubs as part of a trade deadline deal in 1999 before making his MLB debut with Chicago in April of 2000. He was still only 22 years old in July of 2001 when the Cubs traded him to the Brewers in a deal involving reliever David Weathers.

Quevedo made 45 appearances, including 43 starts, for the Brewers over parts of three seasons, including a complete game shutout in a 2-0 win over the Padres on May 25, 2002. That outing came just a few months after he made headlines for the wrong reasons by being unable to complete a mandatory one-mile run in spring training.

Quevedo’s final MLB appearance was as a member of the Brewers in September of 2003 but he pitched professionally as recently as 2008, when he appeared in nine games for Aragua in the Venezuelan Winter League. All told, he pitched just over 1000 professional innings.

Bryan Clutterbuck, age 56, passed away on August 23

A seventh-round pick in the 1981 draft, Clutterbuck was just the 13th alum of Eastern Michigan University to pitch in the majors when he made his MLB debut in July of 1986. He appeared in 20 games for the Brewers down the stretch that season before returning to the minors in 1987 and later resurfacing in the big leagues as a starter in 1989.

Clutterbuck picked up his first MLB win on April 25, 1989, pitching a complete game in a 10-4 victory over the Twins. He pitched that game on just two days’ rest following a relief outing on April 22. Less than two months later, he made his final MLB appearance on June 23.

Juan Bell, age 48, passed away on August 24

A Dominican native and brother of 1987 AL MVP George Bell, Juan Bell was signed by the Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1984 and played in the majors for the Orioles and Phillies before the Brewers selected him off waivers in June of 1993.

Bell appeared in 91 games in his lone partial season in Milwaukee, playing primarily as a shortstop and second baseman but also appearing occasionally in the outfield. With the Brewers he batted .234 with a .321 on-base percentage and .322 slugging in 327 plate appearances. Including his 24 appearances with the Phillies before being waived, he set career highs that season in games played (115), plate appearances (400), hits (80), runs scored (47) and home runs (5).

Seth McClung Jersey Outlet

What’s going on everybody? My name is Bryan Woodward. I am very pleased to be given this opportunity to contribute to this great site. I will be covering the Gulf Coast League beginning with the 2020 season. I am planning to contribute in other ways as well.

I was born in Lakewood, New Jersey and have been around this game since that very day! When I was first able to walk, I was given the classic Playskool baseball set with the yellow bat and brown glove and soft plush baseballs. I have pictures and home videos of me swinging that thing as early as 14 months! Fast forward now being 31, I STILL have the set! It’s in great shape and will be given to my first born! They just don’t make things like they used too!

As I grew older, my father got me into baseball cards. Since then, I have not only been an avid collector, but also have grown the hobby into a small little side business. You can find me on Instagram @RedBeardSportsCards and also on eBay under that same name! I am big into Bowman products and Topps flagship Rookie Cards.

I played the game my entire life, from the age of 4 up until my age 27 summer when I had to call it quits due to an eye condition called Myopic Degeneration. With my ability to play the game taken away, I decided to move to Florida and opened a baseball facility called The Hack Shack. I also co-founded, directed and coached the Florida Gulf Coast Prospects travel baseball organization with former MLB Pitcher Seth McClung for the first two years I lived here. I have now begun my own travel organization, the Tampa Skyhawks. 2020 will be our inaugural season. The goal of the organization is to make sure all of our players are found a home to continue their careers into college.

This brings me to my involvement in fantasy baseball. I play APBA baseball in a face to face league called the Jersey Central League. It is based in New Jersey/Pennsylvania and has been in existence since 1978. I joined the league when I was just 16. All credit here goes to my dad as well for getting me involved at such a young age. I also play in numerous re-draft fantasy leagues as well as a couple dynasty leagues. I just got into my first 30-team dynasty and am loving every second of it. Finally a place to put all of my knowledge to use!

As you can see, I am connected with this game in so very many ways. I was already a frequent visitor to Gulf Coast League games and always wanted to have a purpose other than for my own enjoyment. This will now give me that purpose and make the days in the Florida heat just that much more worth it! I hope to provide you all with great insight into one of the hidden gems of minor league baseball!

Feel free to reach out to me on Twitter or Instagram @CoachBarbaRoja to discuss anything Gulf Coast League or request some specific coverage!

Conor Jackson Jersey Outlet

Let’s sat that a “robust” discussion broke out in the comments in regard to the potential Rookie of the Year candidates. Jack, in particular, made a sterling case for the inclusion of one player, and after shuffling through all the contributions and lists, we’ve come up with the following five candidates for your consideration.

Zac Gallen

An unexpected arrival at the end of July, Gallen more than lived up to expectations down the stretch, posting a 2.89 ERA over eight starts. He struck out 53 batters in 43.2 innings of work, and looked as good a trade-deadline pitching acquisition as Arizona have had since Daniel Hudson in 2010. He made an immediate impact, tossing five shutout innings of one-hit ball in his first start on August 7. But his best appearance of the year came on September 4 against the Padres. Zac again allowed one hit, this time over seven innings, striking out eight while walking just one. He has yet to allow more than three runs in a major-league game, a 15-start streak not surpassed to open a career in the NL since Steve Rogers in 1973.

Kevin Ginkel

When Michael wrote up the D-backs’ prospects top 30 list last winter, Ginkel barely made it, squeaking in at #29. It’s not just Mike: I couldn’t find any list that had Kevin listed in the top twenty. But he blitzed through the season, despite missing all of June with elbow inflammation, posting a 1.78 ERA with 63 K’s over 35.1 innings before his call-up. His major-league numbers were scarcely less impressive: a 1.48 ERA and 28 strikeouts in 24.1 innings. Ginkel even picked up a pair of saves (the first is shown above), though his most notable outing was probably on September 23. In the seventh inning against St. Louis, the rookie struck out some guy called Paul Goldschmidt, Yadier Molina and Paul DeJong.

Merrill Kelly

0:00
/ 1:14

No-one knew for sure how Kelly would work out, facing major-league batters for the first time, after four years pitching in Korea. But he seemed to figure it out, leading the team in innings pitched. His 183.1 IP trailed only Wade Miley’s 2012 (194.2) among Arizona rookies in franchise history, and at 4.42, his ERA was barely distinguishable from Robbie Ray. Merrill won his debut on April 1, and six days later had what was probably his best start (above), holding the reigning World Series champion Red Sox to a Mitch Moreland home-run over eight innings, striking out nine and walking none. He finished strong, winning four of his last five starts while putting up a 2.18 ERA. Hopefully that bodes well for 2020.

Tim Locastro

Locastro hit by pitch 3 times in the same game
History was made on Friday night and it had nothing to do with the 18 runs scored by the #Dbacks. Tim Locastro tied a Major League record by being hit by a pitch 3 times in the same game.

Posted by Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday, May 25, 2019
I wanted to assemble a video montage of Locastro being hit by pitches, accompanied by Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture. Unfortunately, you will have to settle for the above, the contest on May 24 where Tim became the first-ever Diamondback – and at the time only the 10th National Leaguer ever – to be hit by three pitches in the same game. We all know about Locastro setting a franchise record for HBP, being plunked 22 times in only 250 PA. But that wasn’t the only admirable aspect of his game. He was a perfect 17-0 in stolen bases, setting an NL rookie record for most SB without getting caught. His career 22-0 is currently most ever in the majors there. And I didn’t even get to mention his solid defense and hustle.

Christian Walker

After spending his entire career behind All-Star first-basemen – first, Chris Davis in Baltimore, then Paul Goldschmidt here – it seemed that Walker might still find himself limited in playing time, playing platoon fiddle to Jake Lamb at first-base. But after Lamb went down, just seven games into the season, Walker took over and made the very most of his opportunity. His 29 home-runs were second-most by a D-backs rookie ever (Chris Young had 32 in 2007), and his 73 RBI were also second-most (Conor Jackson, of all people, had 79 in 2006). While earning a twenty-fifth of what Goldschmidt did in St. Louis, Walker had a not dissimilar season, and even picked up an unexpected Gold Glove nomination. Above, his two-homer game where he put up a season-high for Arizona +71.2% in Win Probability.

Anthony Bemboom Jersey Outlet

ANAHEIM — After the decision to non-tender Kevan Smith on Monday, the Angels are officially in the market for a catcher this offseason.

The Angels have just two catchers on their 40-man roster in Max Stassi and Anthony Bemboom, and Stassi might not be ready for Opening Day after undergoing right hip surgery this offseason. The club also doesn’t have any catching prospects close to the Majors after permanently moving Taylor Ward to the outfield and Matt Thaiss to the infield.

So here’s a look at available catchers both via trade and free agency that the Angels could target this winter:

Martín Maldonado

A reunion with Maldonado could make some sense, especially considering his relationship with Gerrit Cole, who remains the club’s top target in its search for starting pitching. Maldonado, 33, played with the Angels in 2017 and ’18 before being traded to the Astros. He worked well with Cole last season, essentially becoming his personal catcher in the second half. Cole had a 1.57 ERA in 10 starts with Maldonado compared to a 2.94 ERA with other Houston backstops. He’s still a solid defender, but he doesn’t offer much offense, hitting .213/.293/.378 with 12 homers and 27 RBIs in 101 games in ’19.

Robinson Chirinos

Chirinos is also a free-agent catcher from the Astros and is a better hitter than Maldonado, batting .238/.347/.443 with 17 homers and 58 RBIs in 114 games while also smacking three postseason homers. The 35-year-old is two years older than Maldonado but figures to get more in free agency because of his bat. He also graded out well defensively last year.

Jason Castro

Castro, 32, is a free agent and is coming off a bounceback year in 2019 after missing most of the ’18 campaign because of knee surgery. Castro hit .232/.332/.435 with 13 homers and 30 RBIs, playing 79 games as a backup to Mitch Garver. Castro, a northern California native who attended Stanford, works well with pitchers and was rated as an average defensive catcher by advanced metrics last year.

Castro hits Twins’ 307th HR
Sep 30th, 2019 · 0:43
Castro hits Twins’ 307th HR
Alex Avila

Avila has been plagued by concussion issues throughout his career but remains a reliable backstop with strong on-base skills. The 32-year-old batted .207/.353/.421 with nine homers and 24 RBIs in 63 games with the D-backs last year. He’s been relegated to a backup role the last two seasons but is rated as an above-average pitch framer, which could help Angels pitchers.

Avila’s 432-foot smash
Aug 4th, 2019 · 0:36
Avila’s 432-foot smash
Russell Martin

Could Martin move across town from the Dodgers to the Angels? Martin, 36, remains one of the best pitch framers in the Majors and is known for his leadership skills and ability to work with pitchers. Offensively, he’s declined, however, hitting .220/.337/.330 with six homers and 20 RBIs in 83 games. He also could be looking to sign with a ready-made contender, although the Angels are obviously trying to reach the postseason in 2020.

Martin’s go-ahead 3-run homer
Sep 4th, 2019 · 0:55
Martin’s go-ahead 3-run homer
Willson Contreras

Unlike the others, Contreras is not a free agent, and it would take quite the haul to acquire him via trade from the Cubs. But the need is there and he has a history with new manager Joe Maddon. The Angels are much more likely to use their resources to acquire top-tier pitching, but the idea of trading for Contreras is tantalizing considering his combination of offensive and defensive skills and the fact he’s under contract through the 2022 season. The 27-year-old hit .272/.355/.533 with 24 homers and 64 RBIs in 105 games last season.

Contreras nabs Hiura at second
Aug 3rd, 2019 · 0:17
Contreras nabs Hiura at second
Omar Narváez

The Mariners are looking to trade Narváez but the Angels could be ruled out simply because of Mariners general manager Jerry Dipoto doesn’t have a good relationship with his former organization. But if the two clubs get past that, Narváez would be an upgrade for the Angels and wouldn’t require the same kind of prospects as a trade for Contreras. Narváez, 27, is also under contract through 2022, however, and is coming off the best year of his career. He hit .278/.353/.469 with 22 homers and 55 RBIs in 132 games but was rated as a below-average catcher.