Category Archives: Authentic MLB Jerseys

Bill Greenwood Jersey Outlet

Nov. 7: Karen Daley Oliver, C.W. Trimble, Larry Newbill, Cynthia Holberton, Lula Mae Stanfield, Briley James Moore, Michael Ferrell

Nov. 8: Herbert Pregnall, John Easley Richie, Henry M. Shiflett, Charles Parker, Tracy Cathryn Clarke, Sammy “Huck” Smith, Larry Stovall, Crystal Clary, Kristin Newcomb

Nov. 9: Jennifer Clark, Timothy Wade, Beth R. Tingen, Theodore D. Watkins, Jason Owen, Jessica Cary Shelton, Henry Hurt Edmunds II, Audrey J. Hudson, Trent Hundley Gilliland, Derwin Blanks, Duane Allen Murphy, Christopher Michael Fallen, Gus Thomas Fallen, John Page Gravitt, Louise Spangler

Nov. 10: Jayla Jeffress, Freida Virginia Dalton, Bill Greenwood, William Thomas Yates, Linda Hughes, Emmett Tuck, Pete Ingram, Marvin Ligon, Sara L. Throckmorton, Shannon Forlines

Nov. 11: Mabel Calvin, A.B. Jones, Diane P. Conner, Anne Walton, Mary N. Bomar, Frank Woltz, Eddie Royster, Issac C. Comer, Elmo H. Whitlow, John H. Watts, Allen U. Gravitt, Melvin W. Price, Russell Puckett Jr., R. Henry Stanfield, Lester Smith

Nov. 12: Garnett J. Bomar, Edward Conner Jr., Mary B. Medley

Nov. 13: Allison C. Dunn, Tommy Wilborn, Charlie H. Guill, Peggy L. Wazeka, Buck Thaxton, John Humphries Jr., Bethanie Tucker, Jhaquill Holmes-Wooden

Reed Johnson Jersey Outlet

Students were able to select classes from a course catalogue filled with both beloved classics (Political Theory, Jane Austen, Deconstructing Racism, etc.) and sixty-one classes new to Bowdoin.
A student listens in a class
We focused on a handful of new courses—in digital and computational studies, economics, history, religion, and Russian—chosen somewhat arbitrarily to highlight the ways visiting or new professors are sharing their expertise and how tenured professors are recrafting their intellectual interests into new offerings.

DCS: 3450 Cognition in Analog and Digital Environments
Eric Chown, Professor of Digital and Computational Studies
Eric Chown
Though his class is new, Chown says his fascination with the intersection of human cognition and computation dates back to his graduate school days, when he studied with an environmental psychologist who investigated how our natural and constructed environments shape us.

This topic is perhaps even more pressing today, since it’s not just the physical world around us but also our digital world that has the capacity to profoundly influence how and what we think. In some ways, our brains weren’t designed to cope with today’s frenetic bursts of enticing stimuli. “Most of us are suffering from damaged attention,” Chown said.

In his class, students study Reed Johnson evolution and the brain—how we process information—and also how we are susceptible to digital misinformation and manipulation. Importantly, they also address what can be done about it.

“We discuss how virtual environments could be designed to be supportive, to be cognitively helpful so people can thrive in them,” Chown said. “And we’ll talk about ways of optimizing learning and how to use things like the digital world effectively,” he added. In the end, he hopes the students leave with an understanding that “there are ways they can take ownership of their attention.”

ECON: 3501 Poverty and Economic Development
Marc Rockmore, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics
Female student laughs in class
In Poverty and Economic Development, students study economic systems on large and small scales, zooming in as close as looking at how poverty influences individuals’ decision-making and fates. While the class focuses primarily on sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, it also touches on poverty in other parts of the world, including the United States.

“Within this seminar, we’re moving a little bit outside of economics,” Rockmore said. He lays other academic disciplines, like biology, epidemiology, and climate science, on top of the traditional study of economics. For instance, the class is considering the biology of learning—how the first two years of life are critical to life outcomes—and they are reading studies on how a slight increase in temperature can affect people’s mental health and life outcomes.

“What I try to do in this process is give students a broader sense of not only how these different forces come together and shape poverty, but also how poverty interacts with these forces and can make them worse,” Rockmore said.

Al Krumm Jersey Outlet

“Humillarme” es el nombre de la canción con la que Nebular regresa a los principales canales de reproducción de música online y a los escenarios, tras un receso de dos años.

El trío formado por Lucas Pino en voz y guitarra, Nicolás Allendes en voz y bajo y Sebastián Sidharta, en la batería y coros, estrena el video que corresponde al primer single de lo que será su esperado segundo disco.

La canción está inspirada en vivencias reales e historias de vida y se caracteriza por un sonido mucho más orgánico y crudo, cuya letra contiene pasajes contingentes.

“Humillarme es una gran síntesis de lo que propone este segundo disco, mucho más rockero”, explica Lucas Pino.

El video que retrata la rabia y lucha personal que provoca un amor mal correspondido, fue dirigido por el reconocido artista visual Pascal Krumm, responsable de algunos videos y un documental para Los Bunkers. Krumm dirigió la primera película de rock desarrollada para internet, y ha ganado diferentes premios como el FVCLIP (Festival del Video Clip Chileno) y el Festival In-Edit.

Nebular lanzó en 2013 su primer disco “Sentir”, cuyo primer single y video “Alejarte Hoy De Mí”, logró gran rotación en MTV, Ritmoson Latino y Via X, además de estar presentes en importantes y variados medios del país.

Debido a su éxito la banda visitó tierras aztecas con una agenda cargada de promoción por Ciudad de México, con presentaciones en el D.F., Puebla y Toluca. Posteriormente, en el año 2016 continuó su promoción por Lima Perú, para dar paso a una gira por Chile.

Crash Davis Jersey Outlet

STREETSBORO — He played in front of a packed house.

And some of his biggest fans were practically on top of him.

Thus, Bryce Vecchio had a decision to make.

Should he go for the more conventional honey mustard or should he add some special sauce?

“I was thinking I was going to dunk it and then I was like, ‘I don’t know,’” Vecchio said.

At the very last second, the 6-foot-5 sophomore forward opted for ordinary rather than extraordinary.

Alas, it turned out to be disastrous.

Vecchio’s layup attempt wound up bouncing off the rim and into a frenemy’s hands.

No razzle dazzle. No roar from the well-wishers. Just one distraught young man who wanted to crawl into his own black hole.

“I don’t know what I was thinking,” a befuddled Vecchio said.

In the end, everything turned out OK for the first-year varsity basketball player.

Very OK, as a matter of fact.

Thanks to Vecchio’s game-high 28 points, host Streetsboro made a dazzling 2019-20 debut with a thrilling 67-65 victory over Aurora Tuesday.

Vecchio proved he was human on a couple of occasions. He missed two layups down the stretch that probably could have iced the game for the Rockets.

The rookie sensation was just about unstoppable on every other play, though.

Vecchio converted 13-of-20 shots from the floor, including two 3-pointers. He also added eight rebounds.

And one may want to take this into consideration when it comes to the stellar sophomore’s scintillating performance: It was his first career varsity start.

Unlike many athletes, Vecchio didn’t spend much time working his way through the minor leagues like Crash Davis did.

The precocious sophomore, on the other hand, has taken a much quicker route to “the show.”

And like another hotshot rookie did in the 1988 classic baseball film Bull Durham, this gifted sophomore will continue to bring the “heat.”

“Bryce was tough,” Streetsboro head coach Nick Marcini said. “We were excited to see how he was going to do in a real game setting. He had a couple of really good scrimmages. He’s very talented, very skilled.

“Being a sophomore and never even playing in a JV [junior varsity] game before let alone a varsity game, I think he’ll be better.”

That could be a scary thought for the opposition.

Vecchio boldly attacked the basket on a regular basis.

Let’s just say this kind of massive production was necessary. Streetsboro nearly surrendered a 21-point lead against Aurora, which missed chippy after chippy in the first 16 minutes.

“It feels pretty good,” Vecchio said. “We have a younger team and they have an older team. It was pretty fun to work as a team to get back to it.”

The Rockets don’t expect to play their best basketball anytime soon. Streetsboro had just four practices entering Tuesday’s main event. The Rockets also have several new faces and a number of their older faces are tackling new careers without giving two weeks’ notice to their previous employer.

Of course, this drastic life change isn’t such a terrible thing if you make your home along routes 14 and 303.

That’s because Streetsboro’s football team, which featured a number of basketball players, recently completed its most successful season ever.

The Rockets finished 11-1 on the gridiron and reached the second round of the Division III playoffs for the first time.

“These football guys just need to get back in the gym,” Marcini said. “They just need to get their legs. We’re still learning; we’re still getting better. We got new guys all over the place. We’ll figure it out.”

Fortunately, a baby-faced giant can show them the way. Much sooner than expected too.

“We’ve only had a few practices altogether,” Vecchio said. “Coming out with a win [Tuesday] was pretty good.”

It could lead to “pretty good” things down the road, as well. And it hopes to be anything but conventional.

For Vecchio and his multisport comrades, the more special sauce, the better.

“We have a lot of promise,” Vecchio said. “I feel really good about it.”

Mark Eichhorn Jersey Outlet

Mark Eichhorn turns 59 today. He was drafted by the Jays in the 2nd round, 30th overall, in the 1979 amateur draft, out of Cabrillo College, CA, where he played shortstop and pitched. He quickly rose thru the Jay’s farm system and made 7 starts for the Jays as a September call up in 1982. They didn’t go well, he went 0-3 with a 5.45 ERA and to make matters worse he suffered a shoulder injury. The injury cost him the speed off his fastball.

Returning to the minors he learned to throw submarine style in the fall instructional league in 1984. As a right handed submarine pitcher, Mark threw, quite possibly, the slowest pitches in the majors. He threw an extremely slow change-up, a ‘fastball’ and a slider. And with releasing the ball from very low to the ground, coming from behind a right handed batter, he had a huge split in his stats, righties couldn’t hit him at all, while lefties hit him pretty good. In 1986, his return year to the majors and his best season as a Jay, right handed batters only hit .135/.186/.165 against him, while lefties went .259/.345/.434.

In 1986 Mark had the best season ever for a Jay reliever. He pitched in 69 games, throwing an amazing 157 innings and finishing with a 1.72 ERA. Manager Jimy Williams offered to let him start in one of the season’s final games so that he could have enough innings to get the ERA title, but he passed on it. Had he not spent a couple of weeks on the DL, at the start of the season, he would have likely had the ERA title. Fangraphs has him at a 5.3 WAR and Baseball Reference 7.4 (good for 7th best in Jays history) that year. The Sporting News selected him as the Rookie Pitcher of the Year. He also finished 6th in Cy Young voting and 3rd in Rookie of the Year voting. Williams used him often and generally for multiple innings, pitching as many as 6 innings in a game out of the pen and going 3 or more innings several times. No star reliever would be used like that now.

It is hard to blame Williams for the overuse of Eichhorn. When you have a ‘get some shutout innings free card’ you tend to use it. Mark was terrific finishing the 1986 season 14-6 with 10 saves. He gave up only 105 hits in the 157 innings, striking out 166 while walking 45. He was 3rd in the Rookie of the Year voting, trailing Jose Canseco and Wally Joyner, and was 6th in the Cy Young voting. I’d call it the best season ever for a Blue Jays reliever.

In 1987 Mark wasn’t as good, but still was very effective with a 3.17 ERA in 89 games, setting the Jays record for games pitched in a season. Number 2 on the list is Paul Quantrill at 82 games pitched in 1998. He won 10 games and saved 4 more, serving as a setup man for Tom Henke. Even though he pitched in 20 more games than 1986 he pitched 30 less innings. Williams still would have him out there for 3 or more innings on several occasions, he also used him to get one or two right-handers out several times. Jimy used him as an all-propose reliever, sending him out there in any situation. Eichhorn made the most appearances and faced the most batters of any AL reliever. As always he had a large split with a .642 OPS vs. RHB and a .760 OPS vs. lefties.

In 1988 he was on pace to get into a lot of games again but he suffered an injury in early June that kept him out till September. He altered his delivery to try to make it harder for runners to steal on him and that cost him some effectiveness. His ERA jumped to 4.19, but I would kind of think some of that was because of the number of innings he had pitched over the last couple of years. Since some of his effectiveness might have been due unusual delivery, batters may have been able to get comfortable with it and maybe had an easier time picking up the ball when he released it. And, even throwing sidearm, that much work has to cause some wear and tear on an arm.

After the 1988 season, feeling he had lost his effectiveness, the Jays sold Eichhorn to the Braves. After a pretty average season in Atlanta, the Angels signed him as a free agent. There he was again a very useful pitcher. After 2.5 good seasons with the Angels, the Jays traded Rob Ducey and Greg Myers to get him back on July 30, 1992, just in time for Mark to get 2 World Series rings. He pitched 4.1 shutout innings, over 4 games, in the two post seasons.

In 1993, he pitched in 54 games and had a 2.72 ERA. Cito started the season using him as a multiple inning reliever but as the season went on he was used more as a 1 inning or less, late inning setup man. After the second World Series win he signed as a free agent with the Orioles. Near the end of a very good season with the O’s he was injured and missed the whole 1995 season. He signed back with the Angels in 1996 but didn’t do well. Mark bounced around in the minors for a bit after that, including pitching in the Jays farm system in 2000 but didn’t pitch in the majors again.

One of the things I’ve always wondered is why we don’t see more side arm/submarine type pitchers in the majors. The ones we do see have success; I think if I were a minor league pitcher who wasn’t likely to make the majors (the only kind of minor league pitcher I’d be) I’d give it a try, or try a knuckleball. In the 70’s and 80’s Kent Tekulve and Dan Quisenberry were very successful submarine style closers. As a group sidearmer’s tend to have very good control, but beyond that they don’t have much in common. Some have been hard throwers, some have had great curves or sliders, some throw sinkers, Dan Quisenberry even threw a knuckleball for a while and Eichhorn got by with a slow slow change. You can see Mark Eichhorn’s delivery in this YouTube video:

Sidearmers seem to be pretty durable and have, on average, had long careers. The most infamous one is Carl Mays who is the only major league pitcher to have killed a batter with a pitch. Likely the strange delivery had something to do with why Ray Chapman didn’t pick up the pitch and get out of the way. There were a number of other factors, balls were used longer back then and tended to be dirtier. With no lights at the stadium, in late afternoon, the ball would have been hard to see. But I digress, a lot. Mays was a straight underhand pitcher who threw very hard, a very good starting pitcher, just short of being a Hall of Fame type.

My father-in-law threw sidearm, much the same as Eichhorn’s delivery. He tore a muscle in his upper arm and, having a distrust of doctors, he never had it fixed. He couldn’t raise his arm, but man could he whip a ball. Playing catch with him, I’d always back up about as far as I could throw. Course, he was throwing to his son-in-law, and likely wanted to prove a point. He also had a nice natural curve on his throws. But, again I digress.

Mark ended his career with a 3.00 ERA in 885.2 innings over 563 games. He is now a pitching coach for a high school baseball team in California.

Mark coached his son’s Little League team that was featured in a documentary movie called Small Ball, A Little League Story in 2002. It was about their team trying to make the Little League World Series.

And he sings and plays keyboards in a band named “Soulwise”. They do music with a reggae beat. There is a video:

And, of course, Eichhorn was a personal favorite of mine, I always liked the guys with a different throwing style. He pitched a ton of good innings for the Jays and seemed like a good guy.

Happy birthday Mark, I hope it is a good one.

Jack Lapp Jersey Outlet

OAKLAND — Sean Murphy sat around patiently for three days as he waited to get his first taste of big league action after joining the A’s on Sunday as a September callup. That chance finally came Wednesday, and he wasted no time making an impact.

Murphy provided a glimpse into what the A’s believe is a bright future behind the dish for the 24-year-old catcher, showing off his power in his Major League debut with a solo blast as his first career hit in a 4-0 victory over the Angels. The win keeps Oakland percentage points ahead of Cleveland for the second American League Wild Card.

The home run came in the fifth inning off Angels reliever Jake Jewell on a 0-1 pitch to put the A’s ahead by two. Murphy belted the fastball left over the heart of the plate at 105.8 mph off the bat, the second-hardest hit ball of the night by either club, and drove it over the Coliseum’s high wall in right-center for a projected 409 feet, according to Statcast.

“I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t nervous,” Murphy said. “But once we settled into the game, and of course a home run helps, I felt much better out there. It’s the same game I’ve been playing, so nothing new.”

• Box score

While his group of supporters, which included parents Mike and Marge, his girlfriend and brother-in-law all losing their minds in excitement from their seats behind the A’s dugout, Murphy was even-keeled. He calmly chewed his piece of bubble gum with a straight face as he rounded the bases.

Oakland A’s

@Athletics
Sean’s comments on having his parents in the stands for his first game and home run has us crying in the club right now. #RootedInOakland

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• Murphy’s first homer an emotional scene

It was the sign of a player who knows he belongs here. Knee injuries slowed his progress this season, but A’s manager Bob Melvin knew Murphy, the A’s No. 3 prospect per MLB Pipeline, would find his way to Oakland at some point this year.

“I think he was pretty excited, he just doesn’t show it,” Melvin said. “He’s calm in his demeanor and stoic. He wants to be that captain. But I think he was going crazy inside.”

It should come as no surprise that Murphy’s first hit left the yard. This just continues a trend he began this year at Triple-A Las Vegas, where he bashed 10 home runs in just 120 at-bats, putting together a whopping home-run-per-fly-ball rate of 31.3 percent.

“That’s not the last time you’ll see him hit a home run to [the opposite field] like that,” Melvin said. “He’s got power all the way around the field. In the last couple of years, he really developed the power. He’s a big kid with great leverage. You look at his exit velos and they’re off the charts. I’m glad he got off to a good start.”

Melvin on Murpy’s MLB debut
Sep 5th, 2019 · 4:26
Melvin on Murpy’s MLB debut
For as good as Murphy’s bat is expected to be, it was mostly his defense that led to his third-round selection by the A’s in 2016, and he appeared to settle in quickly behind the plate by catching a shutout in his first Major League start. He displayed a good rapport with Tanner Roark, who went 6 2/3 scoreless innings to pick up his ninth win of the season.

Roark and Murphy sat in the A’s clubhouse prior to the previous night’s game to break down what type of pitches to expect and to go over signs. Though Murphy encountered some rough waters in the early going, including a situation in the third where he was crossed up and charged with catcher interference on a would-be strike three to Shohei Ohtani, the battery soon got on the same page.

“The further I went in the game, the more he was quick to say yes to everything, which is what you want to keep that rhythm going,” Roark said. “It’s tough to be working with a pitcher for the first time in the big leagues. As we progressed, he was more aware of what I wanted to throw and had a better feel. Those last three innings, we started rolling with quick outs.”

Roark K’s 6 over 6 2/3 innings
Sep 5th, 2019 · 0:46
Roark K’s 6 over 6 2/3 innings
Murphy leaned on Roark’s seven years of Major League experience as guidance through what he admitted was a nervous feeling as he took the field in the first inning.

“Tanner was great,” Murphy said. “He’s a vet with a guy making his first start back there, and he worked with me every step of the way. He let me know what I was doing and what I needed to do. I’m glad he was there.”

In catching the full shutout, Murphy became the first A’s catcher to do so in his Major League debut since Jack Lapp on Sept. 11, 1908.

“Hit a homer and catch a shutout. Not a bad start,” Melvin said. “I think he’ll probably tell you he’s just as proud of the shutout as he is the homer.”

Floyd Weaver Jersey Outlet

STOCKTON — Civic leader, educator and civil rights advocate Floyd Weaver died Monday after a sudden illness at the age of 82.
Among the many highlights of his life, Weaver served eight years on the Stockton City Council, was the city’s vice mayor, honored as Stocktonian of the Year in 1992 for his contributions to the community and received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the NAACP.
Weaver died on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. He helped put the civil rights leader’s name on the park across from Stockton City Hall and the former Charter Way, and was long active in Ministers and Community United Inc., which sponsors Stockton’s annual King celebration.
For Benjamin Reddish, also a civic leader and retired Stockton educator, Weaver provided thoughtful but effective leadership.
Floyd Weaver was Stockton civic leader, educator and civil rights advocate
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Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
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Floyd Weaver on June 24, 1991.
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Coach Ben Parks, left, Adrian Vera and Floyd Weaver share a laugh at the Athletic Hall of Fame 46th annual awards dinner on Nov. 17, 2010, at Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver and Bernice Bass with her children Khalilah, Faizah, and Elijah follow the Lincoln High color guard leading the Martin Luther King parade past City Hall on Jan. 19, 2009.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that were once located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Floyd Weaver on Feb. 6, 1978.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Larry Stanford, left, former vice mayor Floyd Weaver, minister Walter Clay and pastor John Easter play dominoes at the Ministers and Community United, Inc. annual picnic at Kennedy Community Center Park on Aug. 20, 2011, in south Stockton.
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Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
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Floyd Weavere gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located at the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Vice mayor Floyd Weaver is interviewed by Sierra Middle School student Andy Murray, 12, for his school newspaper and his 4-H club at election central at the county courthouse on Nov. 4, 1992.
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District 6 candidate Floyd Weaver, left, and district 3 candidate Ronald Coale look at election results on Nov. 8, 1988, at election central in the basement of the county courthouse on Weber Avenue.
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Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver on Feb. 9, 1989.
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Vice mayor Floyd Weaver crusied to an easy win over former city councilman Ralph Lee White on Nov. 4, 1992.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Former Stockton Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver speaks at a march and rally honoring late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. on Jan. 19, 2004, in downtown Stockton.
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Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
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Floyd Weaver on June 24, 1991.
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Coach Ben Parks, left, Adrian Vera and Floyd Weaver share a laugh at the Athletic Hall of Fame 46th annual awards dinner on Nov. 17, 2010, at Stockton Memorial Civic Auditorium.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver and Bernice Bass with her children Khalilah, Faizah, and Elijah follow the Lincoln High color guard leading the Martin Luther King parade past City Hall on Jan. 19, 2009.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that were once located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Floyd Weaver on Feb. 6, 1978.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located in the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Larry Stanford, left, former vice mayor Floyd Weaver, minister Walter Clay and pastor John Easter play dominoes at the Ministers and Community United, Inc. annual picnic at Kennedy Community Center Park on Aug. 20, 2011, in south Stockton.
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Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
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Floyd Weavere gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver talks about the former hot baths that use to be located at the McKinley Park area before the facility was razed.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Vice mayor Floyd Weaver is interviewed by Sierra Middle School student Andy Murray, 12, for his school newspaper and his 4-H club at election central at the county courthouse on Nov. 4, 1992.
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District 6 candidate Floyd Weaver, left, and district 3 candidate Ronald Coale look at election results on Nov. 8, 1988, at election central in the basement of the county courthouse on Weber Avenue.
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Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver on Feb. 9, 1989.
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Vice mayor Floyd Weaver crusied to an easy win over former city councilman Ralph Lee White on Nov. 4, 1992.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver gets dunked during a benefit at Micke Grove Park on Sept. 7, 1996.
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Floyd Weaver waits for the vote count on Nov. 5, 1996.
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Former Stockton Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver speaks at a march and rally honoring late civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. on Jan. 19, 2004, in downtown Stockton.
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Former Vice Mayor Floyd Weaver takes a moment to gather himself while speaking in front of the Martin Luther King statue on Jan. 19, 2009.
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“He’s been in the forefront of a lot of things in moving the Stockton community along, both as an educator and a civic leader,” Reddish said Tuesday.
“He would give the illusion of walking on water, but walking on water meant you know where the stones were in the water so you don’t sink.”
Weaver led as a consensus builder, helping bringing Stockton’s diverse community together, said Bobby Bivens, president of the NAACP Stockton branch.
“He always spoke to the fact that we have to deal with different kinds of people to make things happen,” Bivens said. “He was a person of deep thought.”
Douglass Wilhoit, chief executive officer of the Greater Stockton Chamber of Commerce and a former San Joaquin County supervisor, agreed.
“Floyd (Weaver) was a true gentleman and a true educator and a man among men,” he said. “He was what you would call a citizen politician. … He always held his head high because he always did what he had to do as a citizen politician, and that was represent the people.”
Weaver’s influence extended well beyond Stockton as well.
In 2006, Rep. Dennis Cardoza rose on the floor of the House of Representatives to call for recognition of his many contributions, noting Weaver’s then-current service on the board of the San Joaquin Regional Transit District and the California State Reclamation Board.
“He is an esteemed member of our community, a lifelong activist for all people young and old, and an outstanding human being who will leave behind a legacy to be admired for generations to come,” the legislator said.
And, despite all time he dedicated to career, civic and political interests, Weaver was also a family man, his granddaughter Elaina Weaver-Maddox said.
“He always made me feel like I was part of everything,” she said. “He was always out in the community, but he was a great father and a great grandfather.”
Floyd Weaver was born July 28, 1933, in Phoenix and moved to Stockton as a young boy, where he attended school, including Edison High School, Stockton College and University of the Pacific, where he graduated in 1957 with a bachelor’s degree in education. He later earned master’s degrees from Pacific in counseling and administration.
Before entering college, Weaver served in the U.S. Army and was a veteran of the Korean War.
He worked at the Stockton Unified School District for 37 years, as a counselor, teacher and principal of Fremont Middle School, before retiring in 1990. He was the district’s first male, African-American principal.
Weaver was appointed to a vacant City Council seat in 1988. An editorial in The Record called it a “good choice,” noting that the 53-year-old had spent about half his life in public service, including 10 years on the city Planning Commission and stints on the San Joaquin County Committee on School District Organization and the San Joaquin County Housing Authority.
He served on the City Council, where he was named vice mayor by fellow council members, until making an unsuccessful bid for the San Joaquin County Board of Supervisors in 1996.
That was despite an editorial in The Record, headlined “Weaver best choice,” that said, in part, “We sense in Weaver the combination of knowledge, political savvy, credibility and forthrightness that the other candidates lack.”
But he only somewhat slowed down, joining the RTD board in 1997, where he served until 2009, including two terms as board chairman.
Over his lifetime Weaver served as a member and leader of innumerable community, educational and civil rights groups, including the Esquire Civic Club, a men’s group dedicated to providing scholarships to young African-Americans.
While living most of his life in south Stockton, Weaver has been increasingly limited and unable to drive, Weaver-Maddox said. He and his wife lived the past five months in Somerford Place, an assisted-living facility in the Brookside neighborhood of Stockton.
He is survived by his wife, Ruth Weaver of Stockton; daughters Katrina Weaver of Stockton and Delphine Ramson of Los Angeles; brothers Clifford and Archie Weaver, both of Stockton; sister Betty Lou Ford of Stockton; and grandchildren Elaina Weaver-Maddox of Manteca and Cory Rainwater and Jessica Graham of Los Angeles.
He was preceded in death by daughter Kimberly Weaver and brother Theodore Weaver.
Arrangements are pending through Jesse E. Cooley Jr. Funeral Service in Stockton.

Bob Johnson Jersey Outlet

Apparently, Trump is on his way to another presidential election victory according to BET founder Robert Johnson, reports Deadline.

“If you take a snapshot today, I don’t think that group is capable of beating Trump despite what the polls say,” Johnson, 73, told CNBC. “I think the president has always been in a position where it’s his to lose based on his bringing a sort of disruptive force into what would be called political norms.”

The country’s first black billionaire stated in July that the Democrats running for the presidency have become too liberal and he has no plans on supporting a particular 2020 candidate nor does he have any intention in supporting Donald Trump, as of now.

“I think the economy is doing great, and it’s particularly reaching populations that heretofore had very bad problems in terms of jobs and employment and the opportunities that come with employment,” Johnson said at the time. “African American unemployment is at its lowest level… I give the president a lot of credit for moving the economy in a positive direction that’s benefiting a large amount of Americans.”

Johnson also feels the president’s unorthodox style has an advantage, especially among his core base. “I think the president has always been in a position where it’s his to lose based on his bringing a sort of disruptive force into what would be called political norms,” Johnson, who founded Black Entertainment Television (BET) and RLJ Companies business network, told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble.

He also explained that Trump “brings his style” to the way he handles such issues as foreign policy or immigration. That’s something that the president’s supporters like and the reason why they voted for him and will do so again next year added Johnson.

Johnson is the founder and chairman of The RLJ Companies, a portfolio of companies with holdings in several industries, including the RLJ McLarty Landers Holdings L.L.C., the highest-earning black-owned auto company with revenues of $1.8 billion and ranked No.1 on the 2019 BE Auto 40 list of the nation’s largest black-owned businesses, Black Enterprise‘s annual “BE100s” list.

Lance Rautzhan Jersey Outlet

It is an annual tradition here at Brew Crew Ball to take a moment before turning the calendar to a new year to look back and remember the members of the Brewers and Wisconsin’s baseball history that we’ve lost over the last 12 months. This year our list includes five former Brewers and one Milwaukee Brave. As is invariably the case, I likely missed someone somewhere along the line: If you could please add them in the comments, it would be appreciated.

Thanks to the B-Ref Play Index for their help compiling this list.

Lance Rautzhan, age 63, passed away on January 9

A third-round pick in the 1970 draft, Rautzhan’s big league tenure was brief but he made the most of his time, pitching in the World Series for the Dodgers in both his MLB-debut 1977 season and again in 1978. He was the winning pitcher in Game 3 of the 1977 NLCS despite facing just one batter in the game, his postseason debut.

The Brewers purchased Rautzhan from the Dodgers in May of 1979 and he made just three appearances for Milwaukee. He had lost command of the strike zone at that point and walked 21 batters in 12 2/3 innings in his final MLB season, including ten in three innings as a Brewer. He spent his final professional season in 1980 pitching for the Brewers’ AAA affiliate in Vancouver.

Virgil Jester, age 88, passed away on February 15

Jester made his MLB debut as a member of the 1952 Boston Braves and followed the team to Milwaukee, where he posted a pair of rough outings on the road in 1953 before returning to the minors. He never appeared in a game at Milwaukee County Stadium.

Jester’s passing leaves just four surviving members of the 1953 Braves:

Catcher Del Crandall, age 86
Pitcher Johnny Antonelli, age 86
Second baseman Mel Roach, age 83
Pitcher Joey Jay, age 81

Ron Theobald, age 72, passed away on April 15

Originally signed by the Cubs as an amateur free agent in 1964, Theobald spent time in the minors with four organizations before the Washington Senators traded him to the Brewers in 1970. He made his MLB debut with the Brewers on April 12, 1971. On June 8, 1971, he became the third player in franchise history to lead off a game with a home run.

Theobald was the Brewers’ regular second baseman for two seasons, appearing in 251 games between 1971 and 1972. His 107 hits in 1971 were the third-most on the team, and his .342 on-base percentage was the third-best among players who made at least 324 plate appearances.

Ruben Quevedo, age 37, passed away on June 7

Born in Venezuela, Quevedo was signed by the Braves as an amateur free agent in 1995 and sent to the Cubs as part of a trade deadline deal in 1999 before making his MLB debut with Chicago in April of 2000. He was still only 22 years old in July of 2001 when the Cubs traded him to the Brewers in a deal involving reliever David Weathers.

Quevedo made 45 appearances, including 43 starts, for the Brewers over parts of three seasons, including a complete game shutout in a 2-0 win over the Padres on May 25, 2002. That outing came just a few months after he made headlines for the wrong reasons by being unable to complete a mandatory one-mile run in spring training.

Quevedo’s final MLB appearance was as a member of the Brewers in September of 2003 but he pitched professionally as recently as 2008, when he appeared in nine games for Aragua in the Venezuelan Winter League. All told, he pitched just over 1000 professional innings.

Bryan Clutterbuck, age 56, passed away on August 23

A seventh-round pick in the 1981 draft, Clutterbuck was just the 13th alum of Eastern Michigan University to pitch in the majors when he made his MLB debut in July of 1986. He appeared in 20 games for the Brewers down the stretch that season before returning to the minors in 1987 and later resurfacing in the big leagues as a starter in 1989.

Clutterbuck picked up his first MLB win on April 25, 1989, pitching a complete game in a 10-4 victory over the Twins. He pitched that game on just two days’ rest following a relief outing on April 22. Less than two months later, he made his final MLB appearance on June 23.

Juan Bell, age 48, passed away on August 24

A Dominican native and brother of 1987 AL MVP George Bell, Juan Bell was signed by the Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1984 and played in the majors for the Orioles and Phillies before the Brewers selected him off waivers in June of 1993.

Bell appeared in 91 games in his lone partial season in Milwaukee, playing primarily as a shortstop and second baseman but also appearing occasionally in the outfield. With the Brewers he batted .234 with a .321 on-base percentage and .322 slugging in 327 plate appearances. Including his 24 appearances with the Phillies before being waived, he set career highs that season in games played (115), plate appearances (400), hits (80), runs scored (47) and home runs (5).

Conor Jackson Jersey Outlet

Let’s sat that a “robust” discussion broke out in the comments in regard to the potential Rookie of the Year candidates. Jack, in particular, made a sterling case for the inclusion of one player, and after shuffling through all the contributions and lists, we’ve come up with the following five candidates for your consideration.

Zac Gallen

An unexpected arrival at the end of July, Gallen more than lived up to expectations down the stretch, posting a 2.89 ERA over eight starts. He struck out 53 batters in 43.2 innings of work, and looked as good a trade-deadline pitching acquisition as Arizona have had since Daniel Hudson in 2010. He made an immediate impact, tossing five shutout innings of one-hit ball in his first start on August 7. But his best appearance of the year came on September 4 against the Padres. Zac again allowed one hit, this time over seven innings, striking out eight while walking just one. He has yet to allow more than three runs in a major-league game, a 15-start streak not surpassed to open a career in the NL since Steve Rogers in 1973.

Kevin Ginkel

When Michael wrote up the D-backs’ prospects top 30 list last winter, Ginkel barely made it, squeaking in at #29. It’s not just Mike: I couldn’t find any list that had Kevin listed in the top twenty. But he blitzed through the season, despite missing all of June with elbow inflammation, posting a 1.78 ERA with 63 K’s over 35.1 innings before his call-up. His major-league numbers were scarcely less impressive: a 1.48 ERA and 28 strikeouts in 24.1 innings. Ginkel even picked up a pair of saves (the first is shown above), though his most notable outing was probably on September 23. In the seventh inning against St. Louis, the rookie struck out some guy called Paul Goldschmidt, Yadier Molina and Paul DeJong.

Merrill Kelly

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No-one knew for sure how Kelly would work out, facing major-league batters for the first time, after four years pitching in Korea. But he seemed to figure it out, leading the team in innings pitched. His 183.1 IP trailed only Wade Miley’s 2012 (194.2) among Arizona rookies in franchise history, and at 4.42, his ERA was barely distinguishable from Robbie Ray. Merrill won his debut on April 1, and six days later had what was probably his best start (above), holding the reigning World Series champion Red Sox to a Mitch Moreland home-run over eight innings, striking out nine and walking none. He finished strong, winning four of his last five starts while putting up a 2.18 ERA. Hopefully that bodes well for 2020.

Tim Locastro

Locastro hit by pitch 3 times in the same game
History was made on Friday night and it had nothing to do with the 18 runs scored by the #Dbacks. Tim Locastro tied a Major League record by being hit by a pitch 3 times in the same game.

Posted by Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday, May 25, 2019
I wanted to assemble a video montage of Locastro being hit by pitches, accompanied by Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture. Unfortunately, you will have to settle for the above, the contest on May 24 where Tim became the first-ever Diamondback – and at the time only the 10th National Leaguer ever – to be hit by three pitches in the same game. We all know about Locastro setting a franchise record for HBP, being plunked 22 times in only 250 PA. But that wasn’t the only admirable aspect of his game. He was a perfect 17-0 in stolen bases, setting an NL rookie record for most SB without getting caught. His career 22-0 is currently most ever in the majors there. And I didn’t even get to mention his solid defense and hustle.

Christian Walker

After spending his entire career behind All-Star first-basemen – first, Chris Davis in Baltimore, then Paul Goldschmidt here – it seemed that Walker might still find himself limited in playing time, playing platoon fiddle to Jake Lamb at first-base. But after Lamb went down, just seven games into the season, Walker took over and made the very most of his opportunity. His 29 home-runs were second-most by a D-backs rookie ever (Chris Young had 32 in 2007), and his 73 RBI were also second-most (Conor Jackson, of all people, had 79 in 2006). While earning a twenty-fifth of what Goldschmidt did in St. Louis, Walker had a not dissimilar season, and even picked up an unexpected Gold Glove nomination. Above, his two-homer game where he put up a season-high for Arizona +71.2% in Win Probability.